News Post

A note about 'Notes from the Field'
A note about 'Notes from the Field'
morej

That there is a glut of educational research out there should come as no surprise to those new to teaching, or to those who are approaching their third decade in the profession. But for parallel participants in our learning community, many of the things that land here may be completely new. One of my sincere hopes in my position as the director of The Merck Center for Teaching at St. George's is to help our learning community—spanning faculty, students, parents, and supporters and friends of SG— navigate the complexities of scholarship that abounds our work together. (click the title to read more)

That there is a glut of educational research out there should come as no surprise to those new to teaching, or to those who are approaching their third decade in the profession. But for parallel participants in our learning community, many of the things that land here may be completely new. One of my sincere hopes in my position as the director of The Merck Center for Teaching at St. George's is to help our learning community—spanning faculty, students, parents, and supporters and friends of SG— navigate the complexities of scholarship that abounds our work together.

But educational research is different than research in more traditional, hard sciences (Lagemann, 2000). It's rare that faculty, in their diverse array of disciplines, can agree on a single point of research that might be decided upon for everyone and all of the time. Far too often, faculty adhere to a type of 'personal empiricism' (Teach Better Podcast #75) which inhibits the potential persuasiveness of data. Data, and data collection, might be inherently flawed, or overtly political—as such it might be corrupted according to these opponents (William, 2016). Further still, for non-educators, the the bulk of their experience with education likely stems from how they were taught as students. And while many of these practices were likely helpful, we know significantly more about how people learn than we did even one decade ago.

Given this, some of the research and subsequent posts will likely be somewhat provocative at times. Many will likely challenge deeply held assertions about teaching and learning. Ultimately, we hope that they will spark discourse across the academy and beyond. And in doing so, we hope to serve our students and faculty, to connect our community to the broader world of educational research, to explore the craft of teaching in innovative ways, and to reflect on our work together in service to the greater good of our collective society.

It’s worth reiterating what lives on our landing page related to ‘Notes from the Field’: We don't pretend to have all of the answers, but we do hope to lift the curtain on how we seek to explore better answers to better questions about teaching and learning. We are honored to take up this journey with you, and we remain ever-committed to making St. George's School, a leader amongst secondary schools in the about the future of education.

 

 

Featured Research

Lagemann, Ellen Condliffe. 2002. An Elusive Science: The Troubling History of Education Research. 1 edition. Chicago, Ill.; London: University of Chicago Press.

Wiliam, Dylan. 2016. Leadership for Teacher Learning: Creating a Culture Where All Teachers Improve So That All Students Succeed. West Palm Beach, Fla: Learning Sciences International.