Arts

Music & Theater

Skip down to Visual Arts courses.

Music and theater courses at St. George’s help students explore various means of creative expression. Beginning music students may learn to read music for the first time, while more technically proficient musicians may be challenged to conduct, orchestrate and compose. Music students participate in a wide range of formal and informal activities, from the Chapel Choir to small jazz combos, independent study in Music Production to a course in songwriting, the Orchestra to a capella groups. Meanwhile budding thespians can learn the major facets of set, lighting and costume design, as well as basic production techniques in the Theater Foundations courses. Students wishing to pursue higher-level acting techniques create and bring a character to the stage in the Theater Company course. Recent productions combining students of music and students of theater include “Rocky Horror Picture Show” (2014), “West Side Story” (2015), “The Wiz” (2016) and “A Very Potter Musical” (2017). The Department of Theater, Dance and Speech produces a semi-annual Dance Concert, as well as both comedic and dramatic plays.

Recent productions include Shakespeare’s “Macbeth” (2013) and “Noises Off” by Michael Frayn (2015). In 2016, St. George’s debuted “Behind the Hills,” an original work written by Catherine Farmer ’16 and Laurie Germain ’16, presenting the real-life stories of Rwandans who witnessed the genocide of 1994.

Academic advisors also use this course map to guide students in designing their most appropriate and desired selection of music and theater coursework throughout their time at St. George's.


Available Courses:

Music Foundation
MUSIC 201, MUSIC 203
Trimester: Fall, Spring

Open to all forms

This course is designed for students who have little or no background in music, or for those with some playing experience who want to augment their overall musicianship. As an introduction to the fundamentals of music, students study music notation, theory, reading, listening, history and composition. Basic keyboard skills are introduced and incorporated into the class. Computer-based learning using "MuseScore" provides opportunities to compose music based on the styles and genres covered in class.  Offered fall (201) and spring (203). 

Songwriting
(Prerequisite Music Foundation or by invitation)
MUSIC 222, MUSIC 223
Trimester: Winter, Spring

Open to all forms; Prerequisite Music Foundation or by invitation

This intermediate course is designed for students who already have a basic foundation in music reading and writing skills. Students will delve beyond basic music theory and examine elements of songwriting: harmony, form, lyric writing and arranging. Basic keyboard skills are reinforced and computer-based composing programs used extensively. In addition to composing their own songs, students will also research and present biographical and analytical reports on famous songwriters through history. Offered winter (222) and spring (223).

American Pop: A History
MUSIC 233
Trimester: Spring

Open to all forms

This course will examine the social, technological and economic forces that fueled the creation of various popular music styles throughout the 19th, 20th and 21st centuries. Emphasis will be placed on events, individuals and musical styles, comparing and contrasting the influences each had on the other throughout the scope of the material covered. Basic musical concepts will also be introduced (simple music theory, song form, etc.) that will provide the student the ability to understand what they are listening to and how it fits into each historical era. Offered spring only.

Chapel Choir
MUSIC 250-C, MUSIC 260-C
Full-Year

Open to third- and fourth-formers; a half-credit course

The Chapel Choir is open to all vocalists regardless of ability. Throughout the year students will perform at a variety of events, from the festive Christmas celebrations, Family Weekend, Alumni Weekend and Prize Day, as well as of the weekly chapel services. Students who enroll in Choir as a yearlong course receive a letter grade for each trimester and 1.5 credits toward the Arts requirement (instead of the standard 3 for a full-time academic course). Students enrolled for credit are also expected to complete homework, which may include sectional rehearsals and collaboration with peers to explore the history, math and science behind choral music. Students who volunteer for Choir receive no credit and are expected only to attend all full rehearsals, Chapel services and other performances.  Third-formers should enroll in Music 250-C, fourth-formers in Music 260-C.

Jazz Ensemble
MUSIC 250-J, MUSIC 260-J
Full-Year

Open to third- and fourth-formers; a half-credit course

The Jazz Ensemble is open to all instrumental and vocalists regardless of ability. Throughout the year students will perform a wide variety of material from early to modern jazz, and gain a better understanding of how their instruments function within each style. They will also be expected to play improvised solos based on understanding of chords/scales and melodic elements (use of sequence, instrumental range, space etc.). The Jazz Ensemble will perform for the public four to six times per year; students who enroll in Jazz Ensemble as a yearlong course receive a letter grade for each trimester and 1.5 credits toward the Arts requirement (instead of the standard 3 for a full-time academic course).  Students enrolled for credit are also expected to complete homework, which may include sectional rehearsals and collaboration with peers to explore the history, math and science behind choral music. Students who volunteer for Jazz Ensemble receive no credit and are expected only to attend all full rehearsals and performances. Third-formers should enroll in Music 250-J, fourth-formers in Music 260-J.

Orchestra
MUSIC 250-O, MUSIC 260-O
Full-Year

Open to third- and fourth-formers; a half-credit course

The Orchestra is open to all instrumentalists regardless of ability. Throughout the year students will perform a wide variety of material from Baroque to Modern, and gain a better understanding of how their instruments function within each style. The Orchestra will perform for the public four to six times per year; students who enroll in Orchestra as a yearlong course receive a letter grade for each trimester and 1.5 credits toward the Arts requirement (instead of the standard 3 for a full-time academic course). Students enrolled for credit are also expected to complete homework, which may include sectional rehearsals and collaboration with peers to explore the history, math and science behind choral music. Students who volunteer for Orchestra receive no credit and are expected only to attend all full rehearsals and performances. Third-formers should enroll in Music 250-O, fourth-formers in Music 260-O.

Chapel Choir
MUSIC 450-C, MUSIC 460-C
Full-Year

Open to fifth- and sixth-formers; a half-credit course

The Chapel Choir is open to all vocalists regardless of ability. Throughout the year students will perform at a variety of events, from the festive Christmas celebrations, Family Weekend, Alumni Weekend and Prize Day, as well as of the weekly chapel services. Students who enroll in Choir as a yearlong course receive a letter grade for each trimester and 1.5 credits toward the Arts requirement (instead of the standard 3 for a full-time academic course). Students enrolled for credit are also expected to complete homework which may include sectional rehearsals and collaboration with peers to explore the history, math and science behind choral music. Students who volunteer for Choir receive no credit and are expected only to attend all full rehearsals, Chapel services and other performances. Fifth-formers should enroll in Music 450-C, sixth-formers in Music 460-C.

Jazz Ensemble
MUSIC 450-J, MUSIC 460-J
Full-Year

Open to fifth- and sixth-formers; a half-credit course

The Jazz Ensemble is open to all instrumental and vocalists regardless of ability. Throughout the year students will perform a wide variety of material from early to modern jazz, and gain a better understanding of how their instruments function within each style. They will also be expected to play improvised solos based on understanding of chords/scales and melodic elements (use of sequence, instrumental range, space, etc.). The Jazz Ensemble will perform for the public four to six times per year; students who enroll in Jazz Ensemble as a yearlong course receive a letter grade for each trimester and 1.5 credits toward the Arts requirement (instead of the standard 3 for a full-time academic course).  Students enrolled for credit are also expected to complete homework, which may include sectional rehearsals and collaboration with peers to explore the history, math and science behind choral music. Students who volunteer for Jazz Ensemble receive no credit and are expected only to attend all full rehearsals and performances. Fifth-formers should enroll in Music 450-J, sixth-formers in Music 460-J.

Orchestra
MUSIC 450-O, MUSIC 460-O
Full-Year

Open to fifth- and sixth-formers; a half-credit course

The Orchestra is open to all instrumentalists regardless of ability. Throughout the year students will perform a wide variety of material from Baroque to Modern, and gain a better understanding of how their instruments function within each style. The Orchestra will perform for the public four to six times per year; students who enroll in Orchestra as a yearlong course receive a letter grade for each trimester and 1.5 credits toward the Arts requirement (instead of the standard 3 for a full-time academic course). Students enrolled for credit are also expected to complete homework, which may include sectional rehearsals and collaboration with peers to explore the history, math and science behind choral music. Students who volunteer for Orchestra receive no credit and are expected only to attend all full rehearsals and performances. Fifth-formers should enroll in Music 450-O, sixth-formers in Music 460-O.

Theater Foundation I
THEATER 201, THEATER 202
Trimester: Fall, Winter

Open to all forms

Theater Foundation is a trimester course designed to introduce students to the basic skills required to perform onstage. By examining the foundational skills of vocal projection, active listening, diction, presence, physical awareness, and script analysis, students gain understandings and abilities within the art of performance. These serve students beyond the art form as well, with clear benefit to public speaking, leadership and problem-solving. Students learn and experience the importance of connecting to the imagination, committing to the present moment, and engaging in a creative process. A series of performances serve as formative assessments throughout the semester, including individual monologues, an open-ended dialogue, stage combat and a scene-study as part of the final exam. Students craft and receive constructive feedback from both peers and instructor through each project. Offered fall (201) and winter (202).

Theater Foundation II
THEATER 212
Trimester: Winter

Open to all forms

Theater Foundation II is a trimester course designed to further the practical application of skills to the concepts introduced in Theater Foundation I. Building upon the fundamentals of the actor’s process and qualities of mind, body, and voice, students study a modern play in depth. The trimester is devoted to bringing that play to life onstage through hands-on projects in set and costume design, based in script analysis. The culminating project is a presentation of a set model and costume renderings, which student craft using resources such as the Fab Lab. Students craft and receive constructive feedback from both peers and instructor through each project. Emphasis falls on authentic, student-directed learning, as students make all creative decisions for their final projects.  

Theater Company
(Prerequisite Theater Foundation I or by invitation of the department)
THEATER 401, THEATER 403
Trimester: Fall, Spring

Open to all forms; Prerequisite Theater Foundation I or by invitation of the department

Modeled after a small professional theater company, the course provides cohesive and experiential study of theatrical production for students interested in any area of theater: performance, design, and/or technology. Through student-driven, faculty- supported production of a short play, students will take on all necessary responsibilities and leadership as they acquire and practice both practical and critical skills in acting, directing, management, construction and theatrical design. Course will be tailored according to the specific interests and goals of students in each class cohort. While the course culminates in a single live production to be presented for the community, performing in the production is only required for students who enter the class as declared actors; likewise, actors are not required to contribute the design or technical aspects of the production. Collaboration amongst these areas, however, will be strongly encouraged and supported. Productions will range from classical to contemporary and student-written pieces. Each production process will, through the theatrical lens, explore a timely and thoughtful social question pertaining to the school community and wider world. Offered fall (401) and spring (403).

Dramatic Literature
(Prerequisite Theater Foundation or completion of the Arts requirement)
THEATER 503
Trimester: Spring

Open to sixth-formers and by invitation to fifth-formers; Prerequisite Theater Foundation or completion of the Arts requirement 

The course is devoted to American playwrights and their audiences; the basis of the course is in-class readings and discussion, culminating in a playwriting project. Modern plays include those that explore topics of class, race, gender and war, and vary from term to term. Students will conduct in- and out-of-class writing exercises and workshops while discussing each other’s works- in-progress. Playwriting topics include examination of the “status quo,” various dramatic structures, the protagonist’s journey and how dialogue reveals character. Offered spring only.


Visual Arts

Academic advisors use this course map to guide students in designing their most appropriate and desired selection of art coursework throughout their time at St. George's.

The visual arts curriculum at St. George’s is designed to meet each student’s desire to pursue various levels and forms of creativity. For the most advanced art students, our studios, housed in the Drury/Grosvenor Center for the Arts, are a home away from home when a creative binge strikes. For beginning art students, a foundation course may turn into a new passion — or simply set the tone for a more enlightened way of visiting a great museum. On whichever end of the spectrum they fall, our students find an art curriculum tailored to their desired goals and interests. The Visual Foundation course, a prerequisite for further study, emphasizes problem solving, aesthetic analysis and visual selectivity. Intermediate and advanced course electives include drawing, ceramics, architecture, video art, photography, printmaking, welding, sculpture and three-dimensional design. Advanced Studio Art Portfolio courses are designed to promote the development of a cohesive body of work in accordance with the structure of the guidelines for college admissions. Expectations for these courses are rigorous and the technical skills that student artists acquire during this year of practice can often be remarkable.

Back to Music/Theater courses

Available Courses:

Visual Foundation
(Prerequisite for all other art courses)
ART 201, 202, 203
Trimester: Fall, Winter, Spring

Open to all forms each trimester; Prerequisite for all other art courses

Have you ever wondered what it would be like to be able to draw the things that you see? This course will help you to discover talents you never knew you possessed. Visual Foundation, a prerequisite for all other studio-based art courses, introduces students to the fundamental concepts of two-dimensional and three-dimensional art. Students develop a comprehensive visual vocabulary as they actively confront visual issues and problems in the studio. The course emphasizes the importance of drawing as a primary tool for the development of visual ideas. Media such as pencil, charcoal, and ink help students investigate various solutions to visual projects as they build technical skills. A broad range of formal concerns is presented through a series of sequential two-dimensional exercises. Exercises in the use of line, perspective and value will be explored in a sequence that builds in complexity as the semester progresses. Students will observe the work of professional artists for inspiration and learn to evaluate their own solutions and those of their peers through regular group discussion. Offered fall (201), winter (202) and spring (203).

Principles of Engineering
ART 301-2 (Also offered as Science 301-2)
Two-Trimester: Fall-Winter

Open to fourth-, fifth- and sixth-formers; Pre- or Co-requisite Chemistry
Fall:  Materials        Winter: Energy & Power

This two-trimester course is a survey course of engineering. The course exposes students to some of the major concepts that they will encounter in a postsecondary engineering course of study including materials, proposal writing, research and fabrication. Students will have the opportunity to develop skills and understanding of concepts through problem-based learning. Used in combination with a team approach, this course challenges students to continually hone their interpersonal skills, creative abilities and problem-solving skills by using engineering concepts. It also allows students to develop strategies to enable and direct their own learning, which is the ultimate goal of education. Students will employ engineering and scientific concepts in the solution of engineering design problems. Students will develop problem-solving skills and apply their knowledge of research and design to create solutions to various challenges. Students will also learn how to document their work and communicate their solutions to their peers and faculty members.

Fine Art Photography
ART 311, ART 313
Trimester: Fall, Spring

Open to all forms; Prerequisite Visual Foundation

Anyone can take a photograph. You may have already taken hundreds of photographs during your lifetime. But what makes a photographic image truly captivating? Astonishing? Evocative? Memorable? It takes far more than pointing and shooting a camera. We engage in an ongoing discussion of the breadth of possibilities in the visual art of photography as students become comfortable using their cameras and the most current photographic software. This trimester-long course explores the techniques and applications of acquiring, manipulating and outputting digitized photographic images utilizing Adobe Photoshop. The technical skills for digital photography are covered including refinement of exposure, post-image capture processing and print manipulation. Assignments range from specific exercises with depth of field, portraiture, landscape and abstraction. Students are expected to engage fully in critiques and classroom discussions. Students must provide their own DSLR camera and tripod. Offered fall (311) and spring (313).

Journalistic Photography
ART 322, ART 323
Trimester: Winter, Spring

Open to all forms; Prerequisite Visual Foundation

This course will explore the way images are used in contemporary art, media, and culture. Students will be introduced to the key issues surrounding photography now, led through these questions by lectures, readings, group discussion and project-based work. This trimester-long course explores the techniques and applications of acquiring, manipulating and outputting digitized photographic images utilizing Adobe Photoshop. A series of photo assignments challenge the students to integrate critical thought, exploring a range of formal strategies and thematic frameworks that affect the meaning of their images. Students should have a strong interest in the history, influence, and technical aspects of photography. They should be motivated to work independently and experiment creatively. Students must provide their own DSLR camera and tripod. Offered winter (322) and spring 323).

3D Design
Clay: ART 331C - Fall
Metal: ART 331M, ART 333M - Fall, Spring
Wood: ART 332W, ART 333W - Winter, Spring

Open to all forms each trimester; Prerequisite Visual Foundation

Learn how to weld, make pottery, shape wood and protect an egg from a 150-foot fall—all in the series of three, single-trimester courses. 3D: Clay, 3D: Wood, and 3D: Metal focus on specific materials and the use of both additive and subtractive methods of construction. Three-Dimensional Design, a studio art elective, offers students an opportunity to explore a wide range of three-dimensional form with emphasis on formal vocabulary and the development of an idea. Design problems evolve through the three phases of the creative process: discussion of criteria and development of preliminary ideas, translation of ideas into two-dimensional drawings and execution of plans into three-dimensional objects. Students learn to balance practical issues of function with the formal issues relating to aesthetics. Hand-building ceramic techniques are used in the production of functional ceramics. Students continue to use clay as a medium as they experiment by making scale models for projects, which will be made by using a variety of materials and methods. Formal exercises in wood, paper and welded steel emphasize the structural capabilities of line, plane and volume. Students learn to operate hand and power tools safely in the three-dimensional design studio. The text employed is Block and Leisure’s "Understanding Three Dimension." Offered fall (331C Clay or 331M Metals) winter (332W Wood) and spring (333M Metals or 333W Wood). On the Course Planning Worksheet, please note which materials are offered in which trimesters, and specify a preference, using Alternate to name a second choice.

2D Printmaking
ART 342, ART 343
Trimester: Winter, Spring

Open to all forms; Prerequisite Visual Foundation

In this course, students investigate several methods of print production, print vocabulary and a brief history of printmaking. Through research, exploration and experimentation, images are developed utilizing multiple techniques, both analog and digital, using the hand, the etching press and the large-format printer. Students explore technology in a broad sense, mixing traditional methods of printmaking with new image making techniques. Contemporary relief methods, monotypes, collagraphs and digital prints are some of the methods explored. The elements and principles of design are introduced to help guide students in creating thoughtful compositions. All inks and paints used in the class are water-based and non-toxic. Work created in this course can be used to supplement the Advanced Studio Art Portfolio. Offered winter (342) and spring (343).

2D Drawing
ART 351, ART 353
Trimester: Fall, Spring

Open to all forms; Prerequisite Visual Foundation

2D Drawing offers further exploration of the drawing concepts and skills introduced in Visual Foundation. Composition, line, perspective, value, spatial relationships and the portrait are reviewed and applied to more complex situations. In addition, a color drawing is introduced as well as several projects based on personal ideas and self-expression. This course can serve as a preparation for the Advanced Portfolio courses and students may use artwork created in this class to supplement their portfolio. Offered fall (351) and spring (353).

2D Painting
ART 363
Trimester: Spring

Open to all forms; Prerequisite Visual Foundation

This course is an excellent opportunity to use color, learn a variety of painting techniques and become familiar with master painters both past and present. Through the use of acrylic paint and other water based media, a series of painting projects will be pursued in an effort to develop a variety of skills, techniques and aesthetic concepts. Students will first be introduced to the rudiments of color theory, focusing on the interaction of hue, value and intensity. The elements of art will be introduced and used to guide students to develop thoughtful compositions. Subjects of study include still life, landscape and self-portrait. Master painters from the Renaissance, to contemporary will be introduced through images within the context of specific assignments. Each project will culminate in a formal critique in which class participation is crucial. Painting is open to all forms although Visual Foundation is a prerequisite. Work executed in this course can be used to supplement the Advanced Studio Art Portfolio. Offered spring only (363).

Documentary Video
ART 371, ART 373
Trimester: Fall, Spring

Open to all forms; Prerequisite Visual Foundation

We live in a world in which we have access to powerful computer tools and emergent technologies. In this studio course, we explore the creation of complex digital images and the many ways in which video can support creative expression. Students develop projects and occupy the roles of creator, subject and audience. As such, this course is lab-based and hands-on. The goal is to craft documentary videos that can be analyzed both in terms of their intended impact and their ability to elicit an empathetic experience. Classroom activities and projects focus on the use of Adobe Premiere editing software. Student assessment is based on the quality of and ability to present a cohesive narrative, and on acquired technical competence. Students must supply their own tripod and DSLR camera. Offered fall (371), and spring (373) depending on enrollment.

Video Animation
(Prerequisite Documentary Video)
ART 382, ART 383
Trimester: Winter, Spring

Open to all forms; Prerequisite Documentary Video

This one-trimester elective will focus specifically on the use of video cameras and editing software for producing animated films. Students will increase their knowledge of the process of animation from initial concept and storyboarding through final rendering by using animation software and studying both traditional and digital animation techniques. Animation refers to the creation of a sequence of images, drawn, painted, or produced by other artistic methods that change over time to portray the illusion of motion. Beginning with the technique known as “stop motion,” the class will implement the Mac Lab to experiment using computer generated imagery (CGI). Student assessment is based on the quality of and ability to use animation to artistically express themselves and effectively tell a concise story through animation. Students must supply their own tripod and DSLR camera. Offered winter (382) and spring (383).

Advanced Studio Art Portfolio / Drawing and 2D Design
ART 410/A
Full-Year

Open by invitation to fourth-, fifth- and sixth-formers; Prerequisite Visual Foundation

This full-year portfolio course is designed to address a very broad interpretation of drawing and two-dimensional design issues. Light and shade, line quality, rendering of form, composition, surface manipulation and illusion of depth are drawing issues that will be addressed during the first half of the year. The elements of design (line, shape, illusion of space and motion, pattern, texture, value and color) and ordering principles (proportion/scale, rhythm, hierarchy, symmetry/balance and unity) help guide students in making coherent and meaningful decisions relating to composition. The elements are explored and used as a means of artistic expression. The principles help guide students in making decisions about how to organize the elements.

Emphasis is placed on a variety of approaches to observation, representation, abstraction and visual expression. In the first half of this course, students are asked to demonstrate a proficiency in two-dimensional design and drawing techniques as they develop a body of work for the “breadth” section of the portfolio. Works of drawing, painting, printmaking, digital media, collage, and mixed media are appropriate. The remainder of the year, students will choose a personal topic for the “concentration” section. A concentration is a body of related works that demonstrate a student’s sustained and thoughtful investigation of a specific visual idea. This self-guided portion of the course aims to produce a group of twelve works that are unified by a visual or conceptual theme. Advanced Studio Art Portfolio courses are designed to promote the development of a cohesive body of work in accordance with the structure of the guidelines for college admissions. Students will have the option of submitting their completed 2D or Drawing portfolio to the College Board to receive an Advanced Placement score.

Advanced Studio Art Portfolio / 2D Design
ART 420/A
Full-Year

Open by invitation to fourth-, fifth- and sixth-formers; Prerequisite Visual Foundation

Portfolios created for this full-year class are intended to address a broad interpretation of two-dimensional design issues. This type of design involves a decision-making process using the elements of design (line, shape, illusion of space and motion, pattern, texture, value and color) and ordering principles (proportion/scale, rhythm, hierarchy, symmetry/balance and unity) to create a coherent and meaningful composition. The elements are explored and used as a means of artistic expression. The principles help guide students in making decisions about how to organize the elements. Students are asked to demonstrate a proficiency in two-dimensional design using a variety of art forms. These could include, but are not limited to, graphic design, digital imaging, photography, collage, illustration, painting and printmaking. A variety of approaches to representation, abstraction and expression may be part of this portfolio. Students will have the option of submitting their completed portfolio to the College Board to receive an Advanced Placement score.

Advanced Studio Art Portfolio / 3D Design
ART 430/A
Full-Year

Open by invitation to fourth-, fifth- and sixth-formers; Prerequisite Visual Foundation

Three-Dimensional Design Portfolio, a full-year elective, explores a wide range of three-dimensional concepts. Concepts, such as space, plane, volume, form, light and texture are explored through a series of three-dimensional exercises. Additive, subtractive and fabricated processes are utilized to articulate design ideas into coherent three-dimensional solutions. Students are expected to demonstrate a variety of skills, which include traditional sculpture, architectural models, ceramics, wood and metal work as well as industrial design prototypes. Students explore the work of professional artists, designers and architects for ideas and inspiration. Students learn to evaluate their own solutions and those of their peers through regular critiques. Sixteen finished sculptures will be produced (8 breadth, 8 concentration) in accordance with the guidelines suggested by the College Board. Students will have the option of submitting their completed portfolio to the College Board to receive an Advanced Placement score.

Design Science
(Prerequisite one trimester Geometry)
ART 433 (Also offered as Math 433)
Trimester: Spring

Open to all forms; Prerequisites one trimester Geometry, Visual Foundations

This one-trimester course is intended to provide students with hands-on experience in designing, creating, and analyzing two- and three-dimensional geometric structures, sculptures, and models using a variety of media (including paper, wood, metal, ceramics, etc...). Students successfully completing this course would receive one trimester credit in Arts and one trimester credit in Mathematics. Possible topics and projects include tessellations, polyhedra, Platonic solids, Archimedean solids, and the mathematics and design of commercial packaging. Class periods for this course would include lecture/demonstration and hands-on labs. One or two field trips to local manufacturing facilities and art museums would be included. Each student will maintain a daily journal containing research assignments, design sketches, and potential ideas relating to class projects. The resources of the Arts Center, the Welding Lab, and the Fab Lab would be utilized for the hands-on part of this course. Offered spring.

Architecture
ART 442-3
Trimester: Winter, Spring

Open to fifth- and sixth-formers; Prerequisite Visual Foundation

Architecture may be taken as a one- or two-trimester course. Students may participate in only the first term if they choose, or, stay for deeper project work and analysis in the spring. In this course, students embark on a journey of investigation, creativity and discovery. Focusing on design thinking and a wide range of 2D and 3D techniques, students are asked to solve a problem related to architectural and interior design. Through a series of hands on exercises, students explore formal concepts, design elements and principles, and history common to architecture, interior architecture, landscape architecture and industrial design. Alternative building techniques, sustainability, and “green building” are also investigated. Analytical skills and understanding are reinforced through critique, written assignments, and field trips. Maintaining a notebook of design ideas, sketches, notes and research is a key part of the course. The course culminates with a final project, where students are asked to create a tangible presentation that effectively and creatively communicates their design intentions.  Students utilize the Fab Lab and Mac Lab to create their final presentations.

The project theme will change from winter to spring trimester. Here are a few hypothetical projects that may differentiate the terms:

Earthship Design:

According to architect Michael Reynolds, “the Earthship is the epitome of sustainable design and construction.” Students are introduced to the principles of Earthship design and sustainable building and are asked to design an “Earthship” or earth sheltered home. Students create scale drawings and a model for their final presentation.

Tiny House Design:

Students will focus on house design, sustainability and green building techniques as they develop ideas for a small but efficient home. Students create scale drawings and a model for their final presentation.

Tree House Design:

Students will focus on house design, structure and building techniques as they develop ideas for a small but efficiency home. Students create scale drawings and a model for their final presentation.

Honors Sculpture / Welding
ART 453H
Trimester: Spring

Open to fourth-, fifth- and sixth-formers; Prerequisite Visual Foundation

This course provides an introduction to welded steel sculpture. Technical and analytical skills are developed as students employ the concepts, vocabulary and techniques practiced in the Three-Dimensional Design Course. Students learn to operate safely the power tools and welding equipment associated with the fabrication of steel sculpture, including oxyacetylene and MIG methods. The course begins with research and discussion related to the history of 20th century sculpture, with a written paper presented to the class in a seminar format. Students build intermediary models prior to executing full-scale designs. A journal of drawings, research and personal observations is maintained as a method for organizing and developing potential plans. The semester culminates in a large-scale steel sculpture of each student’s individual design. The text used is Nathan Cabot Hale’s Creating Welded Sculpture. Offered spring only.

A Coeducational Boarding and Day School for Grades 9 Through 12
St. George's School
372 Purgatory Road Middletown, Rhode Island 02842
401-847-7565
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